Teen Drivers Collide, One Dead

According to the CDC, on average, six teens aged 16 -19 lost their lives in motor vehicle crashes in 2016. Those teenagers whose lives were tragically lost represented approximately 6.5% of the population in the U.S. As attorneys specializing in accident law, we understand that the reasons for such horrific numbers of young lives lost might be due to a number of factors. Teens are far more likely to engage in risky behavior behind the wheel including distracted driving, driving without a seatbelt, speeding or making grave driving misjudgments, or driving while under the influence of alcohol.

According to a story reported on the NBC affiliate, KPNX 12 News website, another tragedy involving a teen driver happened on the 101 Loop last month. Just after midnight on January 11th, a 17-year-old girl was traveling westbound on the 101 in her Jeep near 51st Avenue when she struck a Lexus being driven by an 18-year-old. The collision caused the Jeep to roll.

Emergency crews arrived on the scene and had to extricate the teen from the wreckage of her vehicle. The teen was then transported to an area hospital where she was pronounced dead as a result of the injuries she sustained in the crash.

Police investigators said in a statement that the driver of the other vehicle was not injured in the accident.

The cause of the crash is still currently under investigation.


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