What to Do After an Out-of-State Car Accident

What to Do After an Out-of-State Car Accident

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What to Do After an Out-of-State Car Accident

An out-of-state car accident can bring double the stress of an accident that was closer to home.  It can mean having to take your car somewhere unfamiliar for repairs or dealing with another motorist who lives elsewhere. But knowing how to handle such a situation in advance can help cut the headaches. Let’s take a look at a few things you need to know before you set out on the road.

Immediate Steps to Take After a Car Accident

As with any motor vehicle accident, after an out-of-state collision, it’s important to take these seven critical steps:

  • move the vehicles out of the flow of traffic, if possible
  • confirm the safety and welfare of all involved in the accident
  • call for medical assistance, if necessary
  • call the police, as this may be required by state law and can be helpful with your insurance report.
  • take pictures of the scene of the accident from multiple angles
  • get names, contact numbers, drivers’ licenses numbers, vehicle information and insurance information of other cars / drivers involved
  • obtain names and contact information of any witnesses to the accident

In addition, it’s essential that you stay calm and polite at all times, despite being distressed. Also, remember never to admit fault: Even if you think yourself responsible, the other driver or another as-yet-unknown factor might be partly or entirely to blame.

Reporting an Insurance Claim for an Out-of-State Accident

The good news about an out-of-state accident is that auto insurance policies almost always extends to all U.S. states and territories, as well as Canada. You should have no problem reporting out-of-state insurance claims. When you call your insurance company to report the accident, the company will assign you an insurance adjuster, either within your state or in the state of the accident, to handle the claim.

Since each state has different car insurance liability minimums, most insurance companies automatically bump up your minimum to meet the requirements of that state. For example, under Arizona law, you’re required to have at least $10,000 in property damage liability insurance, but in Georgia, the law requires $25,000. If you get into an accident in Georgia, your insurance company MIGHT raise your minimum to meet state law. But it’s best to always check your insurance company’s policies to make sure that it covers you. We advise you to call your insurance before your travels and request to have your insurance adjusted for the duration of your travels.

If you are involved in an out-of-state car accident, contact Zanes Law at (844) 9260-3753 for a free consultation. We can give you insight about how to handle insurance companies, obtain fair compensation and feel in control.

Also, if you need help with any immigration-related issue, don’t hesitate to visit our site immigrationinformation.org.

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